Friday, 27 April 2018

Berries extracts as natural antioxidants in meat products: A review.

Food Res Int. 2018 Apr;106:1095-1104. doi: 10.1016/j.foodres.2017.12.005. Epub 2017 Dec 5. Lorenzo JM1, Pateiro M2, Domínguez R2, Barba FJ3, Putnik P4, Kovačević DB4, Shpigelman A5, Granato D6, Franco D2. Author information 1 Meat Technology Center of Galicia, Galicia, street n° 4, Parque Tecnológico de Galicia, San Cibrao das Viñas, 32900 Ourense, Spain. Electronic address: jmlorenzo@ceteca.net. 2 Meat Technology Center of Galicia, Galicia, street n° 4, Parque Tecnológico de Galicia, San Cibrao das Viñas, 32900 Ourense, Spain. 3 Nutrition and Food Science Area, Preventive Medicine and Public Health, Food Sciences, Toxicology and Forensic Medicine Department, Faculty of Pharmacy, Universitat de València, Avda. Vicent Andrés Estellés, s/n, 46100 Burjassot, València, Spain. 4 Faculty of Food Technology and Biotechnology, University of Zagreb, Pierottijeva 6, 10000 Zagreb, Croatia. 5 Faculty of Biotechnology and Food Engineering, Technion, Israel Institute of Technology, Haifa, Israel. 6 Department of Food Engineering, State University of Ponta Grossa, Ponta Grossa, Brazil. Abstract The aim was to evaluate antioxidants from berries as replacement food additives for inhibition of lipid and protein oxidation in meat and meat products, since meats are highly susceptible to oxidation. Oxidation can be delayed/retarded by synthetic antioxidants with phenolic structures (e.g. butylated hydroxytoluene). However, new natural alternatives are needed for synthetic antioxidants due to the controversy regarding their possible negative health effects and consumers' demand for more 'natural' food additives. Berries are a good source of phenolic compounds, especially anthocyanins, which can be used as the potential alternative. Reviewed berries included bearberry (Arctostaphylos sp.), blueberry (Vaccinium sp.), blackberry (Rubus sp.), blackcurrant (Ribes nigrum), cranberry (Vaccinium sp.), cloudberry (Rubus chamaemorus), strawberry (Fragaria ananassa), and grape berries (Vitis sp.). Data implied that blueberries, blackberries, cranberries, and grapes can be useful for replacing/decreasing synthetic antioxidants in meat products. Their extracts have antioxidant polyphenols with health benefits that are useful for stabilizing meat products. KEYWORDS: Antioxidants; Bioactive compounds; Blackberry; Cranberry, cloudberry; Pork meat

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