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Saturday, 1 December 2018

C21 steroid derivatives from the Dai herbal medicine Dai-Bai-Jie, the dried roots of Marsdenia tenacissima, and their screening for anti-HIV activity

Journal of Natural Medicines January 2018, Volume 72, Issue 1, pp 166–180 | Cite as Authors Authors and affiliations Xu PangLi-Ping KangXiao-Mei FangHe-Shui YuLi-Feng HanYang ZhaoLi-Xia ZhangLi-Yan YuBai-Ping MaEmail author Xu Pang 12 Li-Ping Kang 12 Xiao-Mei Fang 3 He-Shui Yu 2 Li-Feng Han 2 Yang Zhao 1 Li-Xia Zhang 4 Li-Yan Yu 3 Bai-Ping Ma 1Email author 1.Beijing Institute of Radiation MedicineBeijingChina 2.Tianjin University of Traditional Chinese MedicineTianjinChina 3.Institute of Medicinal BiotechnologyChinese Academy of Medical Sciences and Peking Union Medical CollegeBeijingChina 4.Yunnan Branch of Institute of Medicinal Plant DevelopmentChinese Academy of Medical Sciences and Peking Union Medical CollegeJinghongChina Original Paper First Online: 15 September 2017 154 Downloads 1 Citations Abstract Twenty-three new C21 steroidal glycosides, marstenacissides C1–C10 (1–10), D1–D7 (11–17) and E1–E6 (18–23), and four new C21 steroids, 11α,12β-O-ditigloyl-tenacigenin C (24), 11α-O-benzoyl-12β-O-tigloyl-tenacigenin C (25), 11α-O-tigloyl-12β-O-benzoyl-tenacigenin C (26) and 11α-O-tigloyl-12β-O-benzoyl-marsdenin (27), were isolated from the Dai herbal medicine Dai-Bai-Jie, derived from the roots of Marsdenia tenacissima. The chemical structures of all compounds were established by spectroscopic techniques, including high-resolution mass spectrometry and NMR spectroscopy, as well as by comparison with reported spectral data. The anti-HIV activities of these compounds were screened, and the compounds obtained displayed inhibitory effects against HIV-1 with inhibition rates of 36.4–81.3% at 30 μM. Keywords Marsdenia tenacissima Asclepiadaceae Marstenacisside C21 steroid Anti-HIV Electronic supplementary material The online version of this article (doi: 10.1007/s11418-017-1126-1) contains supplementary material, which is available to authorized users. Introduction Dai-Bai-Jie is a Dai herbal medicine widely used by Dai people living in Laos, Burma and the Yunnan province of China for the purposes of detoxification, decreasing swelling, alleviating pain etc. It is not only used as a Dai herbal medicine, but also as the main medicinal material for preparations such as Ya-jie tablets and Bai-jie capsules. Originally Dai-Bai-Jie was mistakenly thought to be the root of Dregea sinensis Hemsl. (Asclepiadaceae), but Dregea sinensis has significant differences in distribution, morphology and anatomy, pharmacognosy, molecular biology and chemical composition. It was finally proved that the original plant of Dai-Bai-Jie matches the characteristics of Marsdenia tenacissima (Roxb.) Moon (Asclepiadaceae) in the Flora of China recently published in English [1]. This plant is a perennial climber extensively distributed in the south of China, especially in Yunnan province. As an important Dai herbal medicine, Dai-Bai-Jie derived from the dried roots of M. tenacissima has seen a lack of systematic phytochemical research to date. Previously, a series of polyoxypregnane glycosides form M. tenacissima were reported, where the part of the plant studied was the stem [2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7, 8, 9, 10, 11, 12, 13]. Aiming to investigate the constituents of Dai-Bai-Jie, our phytochemical study was carried out on the dried roots of M. tenacissima. Previously, we reported the work which led to the isolation of thirty-one C21 steroidal glycosides [14, 15]. In this continued work, twenty-seven C21 steroid derivatives were obtained, comprising twenty-three new C21 steroidal glycosides (1–23) and four new C21 steroids (24–27) (Fig. 1). The structures of all compounds were established by spectroscopic techniques, including mass spectrometry and NMR spectroscopy, as well as by comparison with reported spectral data. Herein, we mainly present the isolation and structure elucidation of these compounds, as well as their preliminary anti-HIV testing. Open image in new windowFig. 1 Fig. 1 Structures of 1–27 Results and discussion Twenty-three new C21 steroidal glycosides (1–23) and four new C21 steroids (24–27) were obtained from the 95% alcoholic extract of Dai herbal medicine Dai-Bai-Jie, the dried roots of M. tenacissima, by silica gel and MCI resin column chromatography, and repeated semi-preparative RP-HPLC with different solvent systems. Marstenacisside C1 (1) displayed a molecular formula of C47H72O19 according to the [M–H]− ion at m/z 939.4587 in the HRESIMS spectrum. In its 1H-NMR spectrum, three methyl singlet signals at δ 1.35 (3H, s, CH3-18), 1.22 (3H, s, CH3-19) and 2.17 (3H, s, CH3-21), and three methine protons indicative of secondary alcoholic functions at δ 3.76 (1H, m, H-3), 5.72 (1H, t, J = 10.2 Hz, H-11) and 5.24 (1H, d, J = 10.2 Hz, H-12) were observed. Combination of the 1H- and 13C-NMR data indicated a C21 steroidal skeleton for 1. Comparing the NMR data of the C21 steroidal skeleton of 1 with those of volubiloside C isolated from Dregea volubilis [16], the C21 steroid skeleton could be identified as (8β, 9α,17α)-5-ene-20-one-3β,11α,12β,14β-tetradroxypregnane (drevogenin P). The proton signals of δ 1.93 (3H, s, Ac-H-2), 7.18 (1H, qq, J = 7.1, 1.3 Hz, Tig-H-3), 1.68 (3H, d, J = 7.1, Tig-H-4) and 1.97 (3H, s, Tig-H-5) and the carbon signals of δ 170.2 (Ac-C-1), 21.4 (Ac-C-2) and 167.9 (Tig-C-1), 128.5 (Tig-C-2), 139.1 (Tig-C-3), 14.4 (Tig-C-4) and 12.2 (Tig-C-5) indicated the existence of an acetyl group and a tigloyl group in the molecule. The acetyl and tigloyl group were determined be located at C-11and C-12, respectively, due to the HMBC correlations between δ 5.72 (H-11) and 170.2 (Ac-C-1), and between δ 5.24 (H-12) and 167.9 (Tig-C-1) (Fig. 2). Accordingly, the aglycone structure of 1 was identified as 11-O-acetyl-12-O-tigloyl-drevogenin P, and all its proton and carbon signals were assigned by combined use of 1H–1H COSY, HSQC and HMBC experiments (Table 1). The relative configurations of the aglycone were further confirmed by correlations of H-1/H-3, H-1/H-9, H-9/H-12, H-12/H-17, H-11/H-19, H-11/H-18, H-8/H-11 and H-18/H-21 in the ROESY spectrum (Fig. 3). In the 1H- and 13C-NMR spectra of 1, three anomeric protons at δ 4.84 (1H, dd, J = 9.7, 1.4 Hz), 5.08 (1H, d, J = 8.1 Hz) and 4.94 (1H, d, J = 7.7 Hz) and three anomeric carbon signals at δ 97.7, 101.9 and 106.6 were found, which suggested the existence of three sugar units in the molecule. By NMR spectroscopic data analysis as well as by comparison with the reported NMR data [5, 17], the sugar units were identified as canarose, 6-deoxy-3-O-methly-allose and glucose. Using 1H–1H COSY, HSQC and HMBC spectra, the proton spin systems and the carbon resonances of each sugar were fully assigned (Table 2). The β configuration of each sugar was determined by the large coupling constants (3 J 1,2 > 7 Hz). The connectivity of sugar units was established by the HMBC correlations between δ 5.08 (Allo-H-1) and 88.4 (Can-C-4), and δ 4.94 (Glc-H-1) and 82.7 (Allo-C-4), and the HMBC correlation between δ 4.84 (Can-H-1) and 77.4 (C-3) suggested the glycosidation site at C-3 (Fig. 2). Consequently, the structure of 1 was elucidated as 3-O-β-glucopyranosyl-(1→4)-6-deoxy-3-O-methyl-β-allopyranosyl-(1→4)-β-canaropyranosyl-11α-O-acetyl-12β-O-tigloyl-drevogenin P. Open image in new windowFig. 2 Fig. 2 Key HMBC and 1H–1H COSY correlations for 1 Table 1 13C-NMR data for aglycones of 1–27 (150 MHz for 1–4, 6, 8, 9 and 11–28, and 125 MHz for 5, 7 and 10, pyridine-d 5) Pos. 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 13 14 1 38.8 38.8 38.1 38.3 40.5 40.4 40.4 39.6 39.6 37.7 38.8 38.8 40.4 40.5 2 30.4 30.4 30.4 30.3 30.0 30.1 30.1 30.0 30.0 29.6 30.4 30.4 30.1 30.1 3 77.4 77.4 76.3 76.1 77.8 77.9 77.9 76.5 76.5 76.2 77.4 77.4 77.9 77.9 4 39.7 39.7 35.4 35.4 39.8 39.8 39.8 35.7 35.7 35.0 39.7 39.8 39.8 39.7 5 139.7 139.8 44.7 44.7 139.6 139.7 139.7 45.8 45.8 44.2 139.7 139.8 139.7 139.6 6 122.5 122.5 29.4 29.4 119.0 118.9 118.9 25.4 25.4 27.3 122.5 122.5 118.9 118.9 7 28.2 28.2 28.4 28.4 35.6 35.7 35.6 35.2 35.2 32.5 28.2 28.3 35.6 35.5 8 37.4 37.6 40.0 40.2 76.2 76.1 76.2 78.4 78.4 66.3 37.4 37.6 76.1 76.0 9 47.9 48.1 50.1 50.3 49.4 49.3 49.3 51.5 51.5 52.5 47.9 48.1 49.3 49.1 10 39.4 39.5 37.9 38.0 39.4 39.3 39.3 38.5 38.5 39.7 39.5 39.5 39.3 39.3 11 71.9 71.9 71.7 71.7 72.5 71.6 71.6 71.3 71.3 68.5 71.9 71.9 71.6 71.6 12 77.7 77.7 78.2 78.2 79.3 78.5 79.4 79.8 78.9 80.1 77.7 77.7 78.4 79.3 13 54.8 54.8 54.9 54.9 55.8 55.7 55.7 55.8 55.7 47.4 54.8 54.9 55.7 55.8 14 84.0 84.2 83.9 84.2 85.7 85.6 85.7 85.6 85.5 71.7 84.1 84.2 85.6 85.6 15 34.6 34.8 33.9 34.0 36.8 36.8 36.8 36.3 36.3 28.2 34.6 34.8 36.8 36.8 16 24.0 24.0 24.3 24.0 24.0 24.4 24.4 24.8 24.8 26.4 24.0 24.0 24.4 24.3 17 58.3 58.3 58.4 58.4 59.4 59.4 59.4 59.5 59.4 61.3 58.3 58.3 59.3 59.4 18 11.6 11.7 11.8 11.9 13.7 13.7 13.7 14.1 14.1 11.9 11.6 11.7 13.6 13.7 19 19.2 19.3 12.4 12.3 18.2 18.2 18.2 13.4 13.4 13.1 19.2 19.3 18.2 18.2 20 213.7 213.8 213.5 213.6 213.1 213.3 213.3 213.9 214.1 207.8 213.7 213.8 213.3 213.1 21 31.8 31.8 31.7 31.7 31.4 31.4 31.4 31.8 31.8 31.2 31.8 31.8 31.4 31.4 11-O- Ac Tig Ac Tig Bz Tig Tig Tig Tig Tig Ac Tig Tig Ac 1 170.2 167.1 170.4 167.3 166.0 166.9 167.0 167.0 167.0 167.2 170.2 167.1 166.9 170.0 2 21.4 129.0 21.4 129.1 130.5 129.2 128.9 129.0 129.3 128.7 21.4 129.0 129.2 21.3 3 138.5 138.3 129.9 138.4 138.6 138.5 138.3 138.5 138.5 138.4 4 14.3 14.3 128.6 14.3 14.2 14.1 14.3 14.1 14.3 14.3 5 12.0 12.0 133.2 12.1 11.8 11.8 12.1 11.7 12.1 12.1 6 128.6 7 129.9 12-O- Tig Tig Tig Tig Bz Tig Bz Bz Tig Bz Tig Tig Tig Bz 1 167.8 167.9 167.9 167.9 166.9 168.0 166.9 166.9 168.0 166.5 167.9 167.9 168.0 166.9 2 128.5 128.5 128.6 128.6 130.5 128.6 130.3 130.4 128.7 130.8 128.5 128.5 128.6 130.1 3 139.1 138.7 139.0 138.5 129.9 138.6 130.2 130.1 138.4 130.0 139.1 138.7 138.6 130.3 4 14.4 14.3 14.4 14.3 128.6 14.3 128.9 128.7 14.3 128.8 14.4 14.3 14.3 129.2 5 12.2 12.1 12.2 12.1 133.2 12.1 133.6 133.6 12.1 133.4 12.2 12.0 12.1 133.3 6 128.6 128.9 128.9 128.8 129.2 7 129.9 130.2 130.1 130.0 130.3 Pos. 15 16 17 18 19 20 21 22 23 24 25 26 27 1 40.4 40.1 39.7 38.8 40.4 40.4 40.5 39.6 37.7 38.6 38.6 38.6 40.7 2 30.1 30.0 29.9 30.4 30.1 30.1 30.0 30.0 29.7 32.6 32.5 32.6 32.5 3 77.9 77.8 76.4 77.3 77.8 77.8 77.7 76.3 76.0 70.2 70.2 70.3 71.6 4 39.8 39.8 35.7 39.8 39.8 39.8 39.8 35.7 35.0 39.7 39.8 39.8 43.9 5 139.7 139.7 45.8 139.8 139.7 139.7 139.8 45.8 44.2 46.2 46.2 46.2 140.7 6 118.9 118.9 25.4 122.5 118.9 118.9 119.0 25.4 27.4 25.4 25.4 25.4 118.1 7 35.6 35.6 35.2 28.3 35.7 35.7 35.7 35.2 32.5 35.8 35.8 35.8 35.6 8 76.2 76.2 78.5 37.6 76.1 76.2 76.2 78.4 66.3 78.5 78.6 78.5 76.3 9 49.3 49.4 51.5 48.1 49.3 49.3 49.4 51.5 52.5 51.5 51.6 51.5 49.4 10 39.4 39.4 38.6 39.5 39.3 39.4 39.4 38.5 39.7 39.6 39.5 39.6 39.3 11 71.6 72.6 72.2 71.9 71.6 71.6 72.6 71.3 68.8 71.4 72.3 71.4 71.7 12 79.4 78.3 78.8 77.7 78.4 79.4 78.3 78.9 80.1 78.9 78.9 79.9 79.4 13 55.7 55.7 55.8 54.8 55.7 55.7 55.7 55.7 47.5 55.7 55.8 55.8 55.8 14 85.7 85.7 85.6 84.2 85.6 85.7 85.7 85.6 71.7 85.6 85.6 85.6 85.7 15 36.8 36.9 36.4 34.8 36.8 36.9 36.9 36.3 28.2 36.3 36.4 36.4 36.9 16 24.4 24.4 24.8 24.1 24.4 24.4 24.4 24.8 26.4 24.8 24.8 24.8 24.4 17 59.4 59.4 59.4 58.3 59.3 59.4 59.4 59.4 61.3 59.5 59.5 59.5 59.4 18 13.7 13.7 14.1 11.7 13.6 13.7 13.7 14.1 11.9 14.1 14.1 14.1 13.7 19 18.2 18.2 13.5 19.3 18.2 18.2 18.3 13.4 13.1 13.6 13.6 13.6 18.4 20 213.2 213.3 214.0 213.9 213.4 213.2 213.4 214.1 207.8 214.0 213.9 213.8 213.1 21 31.4 31.4 31.8 31.8 31.4 31.5 31.4 31.8 31.2 31.8 31.7 31.8 31.4 11-O- Tig Bz Bz Tig Tig Tig Bz Tig Tig Tig Bz Tig Tig 1 167.0 165.9 166.0 167.1 166.9 167.0 165.9 167.0 167.2 167.1 166.1 167.1 167.1 2 129.0 130.9 131.0 129.0 129.2 129.0 130.9 129.3 128.8 129.3 131.1 129.1 129.1 3 138.6 130.1 130.1 138.5 138.4 138.6 130.1 138.3 138.5 138.3 130.2 138.5 138.5 4 14.2 128.8 128.7 14.3 14.3 14.1 128.8 14.3 14.1 14.3 128.8 14.3 14.3 5 11.8 133.4 133.3 12.1 12.1 11.8 133.4 12.1 11.7 12.1 133.3 11.8 11.8 6 128.8 128.7 128.8 128.8 7 130.1 130.1 130.1 130.2 12-O- Bz Tig Tig Tig Tig Bz Tig Tig Bz Tig Tig Bz Bz 1 166.9 167.9 167.9 167.9 168.0 166.9 167.9 168.0 166.5 168.0 168.0 167.0 167.0 2 130.3 128.3 128.4 128.5 128.6 130.3 128.3 128.7 130.7 128.7 128.5 130.5 130.5 3 130.2 138.7 138.5 138.7 138.6 130.2 138.7 138.4 130.0 138.4 138.5 130.1 130.1 4 128.9 14.2 14.1 14.3 14.3 128.9 14.2 14.3 128.8 14.3 14.1 128.9 128.9 5 133.6 11.8 11.8 12.0 12.1 133.6 11.8 12.1 133.4 12.0 11.8 133.6 133.6 6 128.9 128.9 128.8 128.9 128.9 7 130.2 130.2 130.0 130.1 130.1 Open image in new windowFig. 3 Fig. 3 Key ROESY correlations for the aglycone of 1 Table 2 13C-NMR data for sugar moieties of 1–23 (150 MHz for 1–4, 6, 8, 9 and 11–23, and 125 MHz for 5, 7 and 10, pyridine-d 5) Pos. 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 13 14 15 16 17 18 19 20 21 22 23 Can-1/Ole-1 98.2 98.1 97.8 97.7 98.1 98.2 98.2 97.7 97.7 97.7 98.2 98.1 98.2 98.1 98.1 98.1 97.7 98.0 98.0 98.0 97.9 97.5 97.5 2 40.2 40.2 40.2 40.2 40.1 40.2 40.2 40.2 40.2 40.2 40.2 40.2 40.2 40.2 40.2 40.1 40.2 37.7 37.7 37.7 37.6 37.8 37.7 3 70.2 70.2 70.3 70.2 70.2 70.2 70.2 70.3 70.3 70.2 70.3 70.2 70.2 70.3 70.3 70.2 70.3 79.5 79.5 79.5 79.5 79.6 79.6 4 88.4 88.4 88.4 88.4 88.3 88.4 88.4 88.4 88.4 88.4 88.6 88.6 88.6 88.6 88.6 88.6 88.6 83.1 83.1 83.1 83.0 83.2 83.1 5 71.3 71.2 71.3 71.2 71.2 71.2 71.2 71.3 71.3 71.2 71.2 71.2 71.3 71.2 71.2 71.2 71.2 72.0 72.0 72.0 72.0 72.0 72.0 6 18.3 18.2 18.3 18.3 18.3 18.3 18.3 18.3 18.3 18.3 18.3 18.3 18.3 18.4 18.4 18.3 18.3 19.1 19.1 19.1 19.1 19.1 19.1 3-OCH3 57.1 57.1 57.0 57.0 57.0 57.1 Allo-1 103.1 103.0 103.1 103.1 103.0 103.0 103.0 103.0 103.1 103.1 103.3 103.3 103.3 103.3 103.3 103.3 103.3 102.0 102.0 102.0 101.9 102.0 102.0 2 72.1 72.1 72.1 72.1 72.1 72.1 72.1 72.1 72.1 72.1 72.7 72.7 72.7 72.7 72.7 72.7 72.7 73.3 73.3 73.3 73.3 73.3 73.3 3 82.9 82.9 82.9 82.9 82.9 82.9 82.9 82.9 82.9 82.9 83.9 83.9 83.9 83.9 83.9 83.9 83.9 84.0 84.0 84.0 84.0 84.0 84.1 4 82.7 82.7 82.7 82.7 82.7 82.7 82.7 82.7 82.7 82.7 74.2 74.2 74.2 74.2 74.2 74.2 74.2 74.6 74.6 74.6 74.6 74.6 74.6 5 69.8 69.8 69.8 69.8 69.8 69.8 69.8 69.8 69.8 69.8 71.3 71.3 71.3 71.3 71.3 71.2 71.3 71.0 71.0 71.0 71.0 71.0 71.0 6 17.8 17.8 17.8 17.8 17.8 17.8 17.8 17.8 17.8 17.8 18.2 18.2 18.2 18.2 18.2 18.3 18.2 18.6 18.6 18.6 18.6 18.6 18.6 3-OCH3 61.8 61.8 61.8 61.8 61.8 61.8 61.8 61.8 61.8 61.8 62.2 62.2 62.2 62.2 62.2 62.2 62.2 62.1 62.1 62.1 62.0 62.1 62.1 Glc-1 106.6 106.6 106.6 106.6 106.5 106.5 106.6 106.5 106.6 106.6 2 75.5 75.5 75.5 75.5 75.5 75.5 75.5 75.5 75.5 75.5 3 78.4 78.4 78.4 78.4 78.4 78.4 78.4 78.4 78.4 78.4 4 71.9 71.9 71.9 71.9 71.9 71.9 71.9 71.9 71.9 71.9 5 78.5 78.5 78.5 78.5 78.5 78.5 78.5 78.5 78.5 78.5 6 63.0 63.0 63.0 63.0 63.0 63.0 63.0 63.0 63.0 63.0 The 13C-NMR data due to the sugar moieties of 2–10 agreed well with those of 1, which provided the evidence that 2–10 had the same sugar moiety as 1, and the identical glycosidation shifts observed in 2–10 suggested their moieties were all located at the C-3 hydroxyl group. Marstenacisside C2 (2) had a molecular formula of C50H76O19 as determined by HRESIMS [M−H]− ion at m/z 979.4924. The NMR data of 2 showed a pattern analogous to 1, except for an ester group at C-11. In the 13C-NMR spectrum of 2, the carbon signals of 167.8, 167.1, 138.7, 138.5, 129.0, 128.5, 14.3, 14.3, 12.1 and 12.0 suggested two tigloyl groups in the molecule. For this reason, the ester group at C-11 was deduced to be a tigloyl group. Therefore, the structure of 2 was elucidated to be 3-O-β-glucopyranosyl-(1→4)-6-deoxy-3-O-methyl-β-allopyranosyl-(1→4)-β-canaropyranosyl-11α,12β-di-O-tigloyl-drevogenin P. Marstenacisside C3 (3) presented a [M–H]− ion at m/z 941.4778 in its HRESIMS spectrum, and its molecular formula was deduced to be C47H74O19. 3 had two mass units more than that of 1. Comparison of the NMR data of 3 with those of 1 revealed that they had almost identical structures except the differences in the A ring portion. No characteristic olefinic carbon signals of C-5 and C-6 were observed in the 13C-NMR spectrum of 3. By comparing the NMR data with those of condurangosides A and B isolated from condurango cortex [18], the C21 steroidal skeleton of 3 was identified as (5β,8β,9α,17α)-20-one-3β,11α,12β,14β-tetradroxypregnane (deacylcondurangogenin A). Thus, the structure of 3 was elucidated as 3-O-β-glucopyranosyl-(1→4)-6-deoxy-3-O-methyl-β-allopyranosyl-(1→4)-β-canaropyranosyl-11α-O-acetyl-12β-O-tigloyl-decaylconduragogenin A. Marstenacisside C4 (4) had a molecular formula of C50H78O19 as determined by HRESIMS [M−H]− ion at m/z 981.5067. The NMR data of 4 showed a pattern analogous to 3, except for the difference of the ester group at C-11. In the 13C-NMR spectrum of 4, the carbon signals of 167.8, 167.1, 138.7, 138.5, 129.0, 128.5, 14.3, 14.3, 12.1 and 12.0 suggested two tigloyl groups in the molecule. The tigloyl group was therefore determined to be located at C-11. Accordingly, the structure of 4 was elucidated to be 3-O-β-glucopyranosyl-(1→4)-6-deoxy-3-O-methyl-β-allopyranosyl-(1→4)-β-canaropyranosyl-11α,12β-di-O-tigloyl-decaylconduragogenin A. Marstenacisside C5 (5) had a molecular formula of C54H72O20 determined by HRESIMS ion [M−H]− at m/z 1039.4574. In the 13C-NMR spectrum of 5, the carbon signals at δ 166.8, 166.0, 133.5, 133.2, 130.5, 130.0 (×3), 129.9 (×2), 128.7 (×2) and 128.6 (×2) suggested that double benzoyl groups existed in the molecule. The molecular formula of 5 suggested that it had one more oxygen atom in the C21 steroid skeleton, and by comparing the 13C-NMR data of the C21 steroid skeleton between 5 and 1, the significant chemical shifts at C-7 (δ 35.6, +7.4 ppm) and C-8 (δ 76.2, +37.8 ppm) of 5 suggested it had one more hydroxyl group at C-8 than 1. Thus, the C21 steroid skeleton of 5 was deduced to be (9α,17α)-5-ene-20-one-3β,8β,11α,12β,14β-pentadroxypregnane, coinciding with marsdenin [18, 19]. Confirmed by combined use of 1H–1H COSY, HSQC and HMBC experiments, the structure of 5 was elucidated as 3-O-β-glucopyranosyl-(1→4)-6-deoxy-3-O-methyl-β-allopyranosyl-(1→4)-β-canaropyranosyl-11α,12β-di-O-benzoyl-marsdenin. Marstenacisside C6 (6) had a molecular formula of C50H76O20 determined by HRESIMS ion [M–H]– at m/z 995.4868. The NMR data of 6 presented a pattern analogous to 5 except for the difference in diester groups. In the 13C-NMR spectrum of 6, the carbon signals at δ 168.0, 166.9, 138.6, 138.4, 129.2, 128.6, 14.3 (×2) and 12.1 (×2) showed the existence of two tigloyl groups in the molecule. Therefore, the structure of 6 was elucidated as 3-O-β-glucopyranosyl-(1→4)-6-deoxy-3-O-methyl-β-allopyranosyl-(1→4)-β-canaropyranosyl-11α,12β-di-O-tigloyl-marsdenin. Marstenacisside C7 (7) displayed a molecular formula of C52H74O20 as determined by HRESIMS ion [M−H]− at m/z 1017.4708. The NMR data of 7 showed a pattern analogous to 5 and 6 except for the difference of diester groups. Comparison of NMR data of 7 with those of 5 and 6 showed that it had the same C-11 tigloyl group as 6 and the same C-12 benzoyl group as 5. Thus, the structure of 7 was identified as 3-O-β-glucopyranosyl-(1→4)-6-deoxy-3-O-methyl-β-allopyranosyl-(1→4)-β-canaropyranosyl-11α-O-tigloyl-12β-O-benzoyl-marsdenin. Marstenacisside C8 (8) had a molecular formula of C52H76O20 as determined by HRESIMS ion [M–H]– at m/z 1019.4888. The NMR data of 8 suggested it had almost the same structure as 7 except for the obvious difference of C-4 to C-6, and the chemical shift of C-4 (35.7), C-5 (45.8) and C-6 (25.4) of 8 suggested the sp3 hybridization of these carbon atoms. Further comparing the NMR data with those reported in the literature [5, 7, 18], the C21 steroid skeleton of 8 was deduced to be (5α,9α,17α)-20-one-3β,8β,11α,12β,14β-pentadroxypregnane (tenacigenin C). Accordingly, the structure of 8 was elucidated as 3-O-β-glucopyranosyl-(1→4)-6-deoxy-3-O-methyl-β-allopyranosyl-(1→4)-β-canaropyranosyl-11α-O-tigloyl-12β-O-benzoyl-tenacigenin C. Marstenacisside C9 (9), with a molecular formula of C50H78O20 (HRESIMS [M−H]− ion at m/z 997.5027), had an almost identical structure to 8 except for the ester group at C-12 by comparison of their NMR data. In the 13C-NMR spectrum of 9, the carbon signals of two tigloyl groups at δ 168.0, 167.0, 138.4, 138.3, 129.3, 128.7, 14.3, 14.3, 12.0 and 12.0 were observed, suggesting that the ester group at C-12 was a tigloyl group. Therefore, the structure of 9 was identified as 3-O-β-glucopyranosyl-(1→4)-6-deoxy-3-O-methyl-β-allopyranosyl-(1→4)-β-canaropyranosyl-11α,12β-O-ditigloyl-tenacigenin C. Marstenacisside C10 (10) had a molecular formula of C52H74O19 as determined by HRESIMS ion [M−H]− at m/z 1001.4797. 10 had two hydrogen atoms and one carbon atom less than 8. By comparing their NMR data, it was suggested 10 had almost identical carbon signals to 8 except for obvious differences at C-8 (66.3, −10 ppm) and C-14 (71.7, −14 ppm), suggesting an epoxy structure between C-8 and C-12. Further comparing the NMR data with those reported in the literature [5, 10], the C21 steroid skeleton of 10 was identified as (5α,9α,17α)-8β,14β-epoxy-20-one-3β,11α,12β-tridroxypregnane (17β-tenacigenin B). Thus, the structure of 10 was elucidated as 3-O-β-glucopyranosyl-(1→4)-6-deoxy-3-O-methyl-β-allopyranosyl-(1→4)-β-canaropyranosyl-11α-O-tigloyl-12β-O-benzoyl-17β-tenacigenin B. Marstenacisside D1 (11) displayed a molecular formula of C41H62O14 as determined by HRESIMS ion [M+HCOO] − at m/z 823.4079. 11 had 162 mass units less than 1, and the NMR data suggested that 11 had an almost identical structure to 1 except for a terminal glucose less than 1. In the anomeric regions of the 1H- and 13C-NMR spectra of 11, two anomeric protons at δ 4.86 (1H, d, J = 10.4 Hz) and 5.12 (1H, d, J = 7.2 Hz), and two anomeric carbon signals at δ 103.3 and 98.2 were observed. By analysis of NMR spectroscopic data, it was deduced that the sugar moiety consisted of a canarose and a 6-deoxy-3-O-methyl-allose. Using 1H–1H COSY, HSQC and HMBC experiments, the proton spin systems and the carbon resonances of each sugar could be fully assigned (Table 2). The β configurations of the sugars were all determined by the large coupling constants (3 J 1,2 > 7 Hz). The long correlations between δ 4.86 (Can-H-1) and 77.4 (C-3), and between δ 5.12 (Allo-H-1) and 88.6 (Can-C-4) in the HMBC spectrum deduced the glycosidation site and the sequence of the sugar chain. Therefore, the sugar moiety was deduced as 3-O-6-deoxy-3-O-methyl-β-allopyranosyl-(1→4)-β-canaropyranoside. Accordingly, 11 was elucidated as 3-O-6-deoxy-3-O-methyl-β-allopyranosyl-(1→4)-β-canaropyranosyl-11α-O-acetyl-12β-O-tigloyl-drevogenin P. Compounds 12–17 presented the same 13C-NMR data on sugar moieties as 11, showing that 12–17 contained the same sugar moiety as 1. Moreover, the identical glycosidation shifts observed in 2–10 suggested their moieties were all located at the C-3 hydroxyl group. Marstenacisside D2 (12) had a molecular formula of C44H66O14 as determined by HRESIMS [M+HCOO] − ion at m/z 863.4423. The NMR data of 12 showed a pattern analogous to 11, except for the ester group at C-11. In the 13C-NMR spectrum of 12, two groups of tigloyl carbon signals at δ 167.8, 167.1, 138.7, 138.5, 129.0, 128.5, 14.3, 14.3, 12.1 and 12.0 showed the ester group at C-11 to be tigloyl. Therefore, the structure of 12 was elucidated as 3-O- 6-deoxy-3-O-methyl-β-allopyranosyl-(1→4)-β-canaropyranosyl-11α,12β-O-ditigloyl-drevogenin P. Marstenacisside D3 (13) had a molecular formula of C44H66O15 as determined by HRESIMS [M+HCOO] − ion at m/z 879.4347. 13 had 162 mass units less than 6. Comparison of the NMR data of 13 with 6 suggested that 13 had the same aglycone structure as 6. Thus, the structure of 13 could be elucidated as 3-O-6-deoxy-3-O-methyl-β-allopyranosyl-(1→4)-β-canaropyranosyl-11α,12β-O-ditigloyl-marsdenin. Marstenacisside D4 (14) had a molecular formula of C43H60O15 as determined by HRESIMS [M+HCOO] − ion at m/z 861.3910. The NMR data of 14 showed that it had an almost identical aglycone structure to 5 except the difference of an ester group at C-11. In the 13C-NMR spectrum of 14, carbon signals at δ 170.0 and 21.3 were observed, suggesting that the ester group at C-11 was acetyl. As a result, the structure of 14 was elucidated as 3-O-6-deoxy-3-O-methyl-β-allopyranosyl-(1→4)-β-canaropyranosyl-11α-acetyl-12β-di-O-tigloyl-marsdenin. Marstenacisside D5 (15) had a molecular formula of C46H64O15 as determined by HRESIMS [M+HCOO] − ion at m/z 901.4215. The NMR data of 15 showed a pattern analogous to 14, except for an ester group at C-11. The NMR data of 15 also suggested that it had an almost identical aglycone structure to 13 except for the ester group at C-12. Thus, the diester groups linking to C-11 and C-12 of 15 could be determined to be tigloyl and benzoyl, respectively. Therefore, the structure of 15 was elucidated as 3-O-6-deoxy-3-O-methyl-β-allopyranosyl-(1→4)-β-canaropyranosyl-11α-O-tigloyl-12β-O-benzoyl-marsdenin. Marstenacisside D6 (16) displayed a molecular formula of C44H64O15 as determined by HRESIMS [M+HCOO] − ion at m/z 901.4191, which was same as 15. Comparison of the 13C-NMR data of 16 and 15 suggested they had almost identical carbon signals. However, the carbon chemical shifts of 16 at δ 72.6 (C-11) and 78.3 (C-12) were obviously different to those of 15 at δ 71.6 (C-11) and 79.4 (C-12), proving that 16 had the same diester groups as 15 but with different esterification positions. Thus, the diester groups linking to C-11 and C-12 of 16 could be determined to be benzoyl and tigloyl, respectively. Consequently, the structure of 16 was elucidated as 3-O-6-deoxy-3-O-methyl-β-allopyranosyl-(1→4)-β-canaropyranosyl-11α-benzoyl-12β-O-tigloyl-marsdenin. Marstenacisside D7 (17) displayed a molecular formula of C46H66O15 as determined by HRESIMS [M+HCOO] − ion at m/z 903.4367. The NMR data of 17 presented a pattern analogous to 16 except for the obviously different chemical shift of C-4 to C-6. Based on comparison of the 13C-NMR spectra, 17 was proved to have the same C21 steroid skeleton as 8 and 9. Thus, the structure of 17 was elucidated as 3-O-6-deoxy-3-O-methyl-β-allopyranosyl-(1→4)-β-canaropyranosyl-11α-benzoyl-12β-O-tigloyl-tenacigenin C. Marstenacisside E1 (18) displayed a molecular formula of C45H68O14 as determined by HRESIMS ion [M−H]− at m/z 831.4525. In the anomeric regions of the 1H- and 13C-NMR spectra of 18, two anomeric protons at δ 4.75 (1H, dd, J = 7.7, 2.0 Hz) and 5.29 (1H, d, J = 8.0 Hz), and two anomeric carbon signals at δ 98.0 and 102.0 were observed, suggesting two sugar units in the molecule. By comparing the NMR data of 18 and 12, it was found that they had identical structures except for the difference in internal sugars. The proton signal δ 3.50 (3H, s) and carbon signal 57.1 in the 1H- and 13C-NMR spectra suggested a –OCH3 group in the initial sugar unit. By comparison with previously reported values, the initial sugar unit was identified as oleandrose [4], and the sugar moiety of 18 was further identified to be 6-deoxy-3-O-methyl-β-allopyranosyl-(1→4)-β-oleandropyranoside. Consequently, the structure of 18 was elucidated as 3-O-6-deoxy-3-O-methyl-β-allopyranosyl-(1→4)-β-oleandropyranosyl-11α,12β-O-ditigloyl-drevogenin P. The NMR data indicated that 19–23 had the same sugar moiety, 3-O-6-deoxy-3-O-methyl-β-allopyranosyl-(1→4)-β-oleandropyranoside, as 18, but differed in their aglycone moieties. Marstenacisside E2 (19) displayed a molecular formula of C45H68O15 (HRESIMS ion [M−H] − at m/z 847.4548). The aglycone NMR data of 19 showed a pattern analogous to 6 and 13, and by comparing their NMR data, it was deduced that 19 had the same C21 steroidal skeleton (marsdenin) and diester groups (11α-O-tigloyl and 12β-O-tigloyl) as 6 and 13. Therefore, the structure of 19 was elucidated as 3-O-6-deoxy-3-O-methyl-β-allopyranosyl-(1→4)-β-canaropyranosyl-11α,12β-O-ditigloyl-marsdenin. Marstenacisside E3 (20) displayed a molecular formula of C47H66O15 (HRESIMS ion [M−H] − at m/z 869.4307). The NMR data of 20 showed a pattern analogous to 7 and 15, and comparison of their NMR data indicated that they had the same C21 steroidal skeleton (marsdenin) and the same diester groups (11α-O-tigloyl and 12β-O-benzoyl). Therefore, the structure of 20 was elucidated as 3-O-6-deoxy-3-O-methyl-β-allopyranosyl-(1→4)-β-canaropyranosyl-11α-O-tigloyl-12β-O-benzoyl-marsdenin. Marstenacisside E4 (21) displayed a molecular formula of C47H66O15 (HRESIMS ion [M−H] − at m/z 869.4407). The NMR data of 21 showed a pattern analogous to 16, indicating by comparison of their NMR data that they had the C21 steroidal skeleton of marsdenin and the diester groups of 11α-O-benzoyl and 12β-O-tigloyl. Therefore, the structure of 20 was elucidated as 3-O-6-deoxy-3-O-methyl-β-allopyranosyl-(1→4)-β-canaropyranosyl-11α-O-benzoyl-12β-O-tigloyl-marsdenin. Marstenacisside E5 (22) displayed a molecular formula of C45H70O15 (HRESIMS ion [M−H] − at m/z 849.4713). The NMR data of 22 showed a pattern analogous to 9, indicating by comparison of their NMR data that 22 had the same C21 steroidal skeleton of tenacigenin C and the diester groups of 11α-O-benzoyl and 12β-O-tigloyl as 9. Therefore, the structure of 22 was elucidated as 3-O-6-deoxy-3-O-methyl-β-allopyranosyl-(1→4)-β-canaropyranosyl-11α,12β-O-ditigloyl-tenacigenin C. Marstenacisside E6 (23) displayed a molecular formula of C47H66O14 (HRESIMS ion [M−H] − at m/z 853.4401). The NMR data of 23 showed a pattern analogous to 10, indicating by comparison of their NMR data that 23 had the same C21 steroidal skeleton of 17β-tenacigenin B and the diester groups of 11α-O-tigloyl and 12β-O-benzoyl as 10. Therefore, the structure of 23 was elucidated as 3-O-6-deoxy-3-O-methyl-β-allopyranosyl-(1→4)-β-canaropyranosyl-11α-O-tigloyl-12β-O-benzoyl-tenacigenin C. In the anomeric regions of the 1H- and 13C-NMR spectra of 24–27, no characteristic anomeric protons and anomeric carbon signals were observed, suggesting no sugar moiety in the molecules of these compounds. Based on analyses of their 1H- and 13C-NMR data, 24–27 were identified to be C21 steroid diester derivatives. 11α,12β-O-Ditigloyl-tenacigenin C (24) had a molecular formula of C31H46O8 (HRESIMS [M−H]− ion at m/z 545.3143). The NMR data suggested that 24 had the same C21 steroidal skeleton of tenacigenin C and 11α,12β-O-ditigloyl groups as 9. Therefore, the structure of 24 was elucidated to be 11α,12β-O-ditigloyl-tenacigenin C. 11α-O-Benzoyl-12β-O-tigloyl-tenacigenin C (25) had a molecular formula of C33H44O8 (HRESIMS [M−H]− ion at m/z 567.2981). The NMR data suggested that 25 had the same C21 steroidal skeleton of tenacigenin C and ester groups of 11α-O-benzoyl and 12β-O-ditigloyl as 17. Therefore, the structure of 25 was elucidated to be 11α-O-benzoyl-12β-O-tigloyl-tenacigenin C. 11α-O-Tigloyl-12β-O-benzoyl-tenacigenin C (26) had a molecular formula of C33H44O8 (HRESIMS [M−H]− ion at m/z 567.2987). The NMR data suggested that 26 had the same C21 steroidal skeleton of tenacigenin C and ester groups of 11α-O-tigloyl-12β-O-benzoyl as 8. Therefore, the structure of 26 was elucidated to be 11α-O-tigloyl-12β-O-benzoyl-tenacigenin C. 11α-O-Tigloyl-12β-O-benzoyl-marsdenin (27) had a molecular formula of C33H42O8 (HRESIMS [M−H]− ion at m/z 565.6849). The NMR data suggested that 27 had the same C21 steroidal skeleton of marsdenin and ester groups of 11α-O-acetyl and 12β-O-benzoyl as 7 and 15. Therefore, the structure of 27 was elucidated to be 11α-O-acetyl-12β-O-benzoyl-marsdenin. The relative structures of twenty-seven C21 steroidal glycosides were elucidated and presented in this work. Due to lack of reference sugars, the absolute configurations of the monosaccharides of canarose, 6-deoxy-3-O-methyl-allose and glucose involved in this paper were not determined. According to the literature reporting C21 steroidal glycosides isolated from this plant [4, 5, 7, 10], it was supposed that the configurations of 6-deoxy-3-O-methyl-allose and glucose should be D configurations, and the canarose was also supposed to have the D configuration by comparing the spectroscopic data with those of canarose reported in compounds from plants of the Asclepiadaceae family [20, 21]. Compounds 1–27 were screened for anti-HIV activites. As shown in Table 3, 17, 23, 26 and 27, at 30 μM, had minor inhibitory effects on HIV-1 with the inhibition rates (x¯¯¯ , n = 3) of 81.28, 80.9, 79.8 and 79.5%, respectively. 5–8, 10–15, 18–20, 24 and 25 had slight inhibitory effects on HIV-1 with inhibition rates of 59.0–72.8%, and the other compounds exhibited negligible effects with low inhibition rates of 19.4–49.5%. The above preliminary results suggested that the C21 steroid and the C21 steroidal diglycoside displayed relative stronger activities than the C21 steroidal triglycoside and C21 steroidal tetrglycoside. Table 3 HIV-1 inhibition rate of 1–27 (each 30 μM) and efavirenz (0.01 μM) Compounds Average inhibition rate (%, n = 3) Compounds Average inhibition rate (%, n = 3) 1 36.4 15 72.8 2 49.3 16 49.5 3 19.4 17 81.3 4 47.7 18 63.4 5 61.2 19 53.9 6 52.5 20 64.3 7 52.6 21 47.7 8 59.0 22 47.6 9 46.3 23 80.9 10 50.9 24 66.8 11 60.6 25 68.3 12 55.3 26 79.8 13 63.5 27 79.5 14 61.1 Efavirenz 99.9 This paper presents a further systematic study on the isolation and structure elucidation of new polyoxypregnane glycosides from the Dai medicine Dai-Bai-Jie, the roots of M. tenacissima, and their anti-HIV activites, as an aid to understanding the constituents of this ethnic medicine, which will benefit the development of this medicine as well as its preparation. The phytochemical work on Dai-Bai-Jie showed that the C21 steroid derivatives of Dai-Bai-Jie had differences from those obtained from Dregea sinensis in aglycone, sugar moiety and ester group, but were more consistent with those of Marsdenia plants, providing the evidence to finally identify the original plant of Dai-Bai-Jie as Marsdenia tenacissima (Roxb.) Moon in terms of chemotaxonomy. Experimental General experimental procedures Optical rotations were measured with a JASCO J-810 polarimeter (JASCO Corporation, Japan). HRESIMS were recorded on a Synapt MS (Waters Corporation, USA). NMR spectra were recorded on a Varian UNITYINOVA 600 spectrometer (600 MHz for 1H-NMR and 150 MHz for 13C-NMR, Palo Alto, CA, USA) and a Bruker DRX-500 spectrometer (500 MHz for 1H-NMR and 125 MHz for 13C-NMR, Karlsruhe, Germany), which were measured in pyridine-d 5 and the chemical shifts are given in δ (ppm). The HPLC analyses were performed on an Agilent 1100 system (Agilent Technologies, USA) equipped with a Venusil XBP C18 column (4.6 mm × 250 mm, ODS, 5 μm, Bonna-Agela, China) and an Alltech 2000 evaporative light scattering detector (temp: 110 °C, gas: 2.4 L/min, Alltech Corporation, USA). The preparative HPLC separations were performed on a NP7000 module (Hanbon Co. Ltd, China) equipped with a Shodex RID 102 detector (Showa Denko Group, Japan) and a Venusil XBP C18 column (8.0 mm × 250 mm, ODS, 5 μm, Bonna-Agela, China). TLC was performed on silica gel GF254 plates (Qingdao Marine Chemical, China). Silica gel H (Qingdao Marine Chemical, China), MCI resin (50 μm, Mitsubishi Chemicals, Japan) and UniPS 40–300 polymer (50 μm, Nano-Mircro Co. Ltd, China) were used for column chromatography. Plant material The roots of Marsdenia tenacissima were collected from Zhenyuan, Simao, Yunnan province of China in October 2011 and were identified by Prof. Li-Xia Zhang. A voucher specimen (NO.111010) was deposited in the herbarium of the Beijing Institute of Radiation Medicine, Beijing, China. Extraction and isolation The dried roots of M. tenacissima (3 kg) were crushed and extracted with 95% EtOH (24 L) under reflux three times, then the extract was further partitioned between EtOAc and H2O. The residue (78 g) of the EtOAc-soluble fraction was fractionated on a silica gel column eluted with CH3Cl3–MeOH (50:1→7:1) to afford 374 fractions (Fr.1 1–374). Fr.1 220–250 was subjected to a MCI resin column eluted with MeOH–H2O (v/v, 70:30, 80:20) to afford 14 fractions (Fr.2 1–14). By repeated HPLC separation with CH3OH–H2O and CH3CN–H2O, 1 (51.3 mg), 3 (27.3 mg) and 6 (83.1 mg) were obtained from Fr.2 7–9; 2 (9.8 mg), 4 (13.1 mg), 6 (40.3 mg) and 9 (54.1 mg) were obtained from Fr.2 10; 2 (66.4 mg) and 7 (57.4 mg) were obtained from Fr.2 11; 5 (31.3 mg), 8 (19.4 mg) and 10 (67.0 mg) were obtained from Fr.2 12. Fr.1 39–98 was subjected to a UniPS 40–300 polymer column eluted with MeOH–H2O (v/v, 70:30, 75:25) to afford 34 fractions (Fr.3 1–34). By repeated HPLC separation with CH3OH–H2O and CH3CN–H2O, 11 (35.6 mg) and 13 (73.4 mg) were isolated from Fr3 9–14; 14 (10.1 mg) was isolated from Fr3 15–16; 12 (7.1 mg), 15 (55.6 mg), 16 (17.4 mg), 17 (6.7 mg) and 27 (7.4 mg) were isolated from Fr.3 26–31. Fr.1 33–38 was subjected to a MCI resin column eluted with MeOH–H2O (v/v, 75:25, 100:0) to afford 10 fractions (Fr.4 1–10). Fr.4 4–8 was further subjected to a MCI resin column eluted with MeOH–H2O (v/v, 70:30) to afford 42 fractions (Fr.5 1–42). By repeated HPLC separation with CH3OH–H2O, CH3CN–H2O and (CH3)CO–H2O, 24 (6.5 mg) was obtained from Fr.5 11–13; 18 (27.8 mg), 19 (7.1 mg), 21 (28.7 mg), 22 (39.8 mg), 25 (7.8 mg), 26 (7.5 mg) were obtained from Fr.5 16–23; 18 (16.2 mg), 20 (55.0 mg), 23 (12.6 mg) were obtained from Fr.5 24–42. The details of the isolation procedure are available as the supporting information. Marstenacisside C1 (1): C47H72O19; white amorphous powder; [α]25DD = +15.6 (c = 0.0875, CH3OH). HRESIMS (negative): m/z 939.4587 [M−H]− (calcd. for C47H71O19, 939.4590). 1H-NMR data (600 MHz, pyridine-d 5): δ 3.76 (1H, m, H-3), 5.48 (1H, br d, J = 5.6 Hz, H-6), 5.72 (1H, t, J = 10.2 Hz, H-11), 5.24 (1H, d, J = 10.2 Hz, H-12), 3.14 (1H, dd, J = 9.1, 4.8 Hz, H-17), 1.35 (3H, s, 18-CH3), 1.22 (3H, s, 19-CH3), 2.17 (3H, s, 21-CH3), 1.93 (3H, s, Ac-H-2), 7.18 (1H, qq, J = 7.1, 1.3 Hz, Tig-H-3), 1.68 (3H, d, J = 7.1 Hz, Tig-H-4), 1.97 (3H, s, Tig-H-5), 4.82 (1H, dd, J = 10.0, 1.6 Hz, Can-H-1), 1.93 (1H, m, Can-H-2a), 2.48 (1H, m, Can-H-2b), 3.96 (1H, m, Can-H-3), 3.28 (1H, t, J = 8.8 Hz, Can-H-4), 3.55 (H, qd, J = 8.8, 6.2 Hz, Can-H-5), 1.49 (3H, d, J = 6.1 Hz, Can-H-6), 5.07 (1H, d, J = 8.0 Hz, Allo-H-1), 3.87 (1H, J = 8.0, 2.5 Hz, Allo-H-2), 4.45 (1H, br t, J = 2.5 Hz, Allo-H-3), 3.72 (1H, dd, J = 9.7, 2.5 Hz, Allo-H-4), 4.29 (1H, dq, J = 9.7, 6.2 Hz, Allo-H-5), 1.56 (3H, d, J = 6.2, Allo-H-6), 3.79 (1H, s, Allo-3-OCH3), 4.93 (1H, d, J = 7.7 Hz, Glc-H-1), 3.99 (1H, m, Glc-H-2), 4.23 (1H, dd, J = 8.8, 8.7 Hz, Glc-H-3), 4.19 (1H, dd, J = 9.2, 8.8 Hz, Glc-H-4), 3.97 (1H, m, Glc-H-5), 4.35 (1H, dd, J = 11.6, 5.4 Hz, Glc-H-6a), 4.53 (1H, dd, J = 11.6, 2.4 Hz, Glc-H-6b). 13C-NMR data (150 MHz, pyridine-d 5) see Tables 1 and 2. Marstenacisside C2 (2): C50H76O19; white amorphous powder; [α]25DD = +31.8 (c = 0.0592, CH3OH). HRESIMS (negative): m/z 979.4924 [M−H]− (calcd. for C50H75O19, 979.4903). 1H-NMR data (600 MHz, pyridine-d 5): δ 3.76 (1H, m, H-3), 5.50 (1H, br d, J = 5.7 Hz, H-6), 5.88 (1H, t, J = 10.4 Hz, H-11), 5.24 (1H, d, J = 10.0 Hz, H-12), 3.18 (1H, dd, J = 9.3, 4.8 Hz, H-17), 1.38 (3H, s, 18-CH3), 1.30 (3H, s, 19-CH3), 2.16 (3H, s, 21-CH3), 6.91 (1H, qq, J = 7.1, 1.4 Hz, Tig1-H-3), 1.57 (3H, d, J = 7.1 Hz, Tig1-H-4), 1.78 (3H, s, Tig1-H-5), 7.06 (1H, qq, J = 7.1, 1.3 Hz, Tig2-H-3), 1.64 (3H, d, J = 7.1 Hz, Tig2-H-4), 1.89 (3H, s, Tig2-H-5), 4.82 (1H, dd, J = 10.0, 1.6 Hz, Can-H-1), 1.49 (1H, d, J = 6.1 Hz, Can-H-6), 5.07 (1H, d, J = 8.0 Hz, Allo-H-1), 1.56 (3H, d, J = 6.2, Allo-H-6), 3.79 (1H, s, Allo-3-OCH3), 4.93 (1H, d, J = 7.7 Hz, Glc-H-1). 13C-NMR data (150 MHz, pyridine-d 5) see Tables 1 and 2. Marstenacisside C3 (3): C47H74O19; white amorphous powder; [α]25DD = +9.6 (c = 0.0583, CH3OH). HRESIMS (negative): m/z 941.4778 [M−H]− (calcd. for C47H73O19, 939.4746). 1H-NMR data (600 MHz, pyridine-d 5): δ 3.80 (1H, m, H-3), 5.56 (1H, t, J = 10.2 Hz, H-11), 5.24 (1H, d, J = 9.8 Hz, H-12), 3.14 (1H, dd, J = 8.8, 5.0 Hz, H-17), 1.32 (3H, s, 18-CH3), 0.95 (3H, s, 19-CH3), 2.16 (3H, s, 21-CH3), 1.92 (3H, s, Ac-H-2), 7.15 (1H, qq, J = 7.1, 1.4 Hz, Tig-H-3), 1.67 (3H, d, J = 7.2 Hz, Tig-H-4), 1.96 (3H, s, Tig-H-5), 4.85 (1H, dd, J = 9.7, 1.4 Hz, Can-H-1), 1.57 (1H, d, J = 6.2 Hz, Can-H-6), 5.09 (1H, d, J = 8.1 Hz, Allo-H-1), 1.58 (3H, d, J = 6.2, Allo-H-6), 3.80 (1H, s, Allo-3-OCH3), 4.94 (1H, d, J = 7.7 Hz, Glc-H-1). 13C-NMR data (150 MHz, pyridine-d 5) see Tables 1 and 2. Marstenacisside C4 (4): C50H78O19; white amorphous powder; [α]25DD = + 24.2 (c = 0.0492, CH3OH). HRESIMS (negative): m/z 981.5067 [M−H]− (calcd. for C50H77O19, 981.5059). 1H-NMR data (600 MHz, pyridine-d 5): δ 3.81 (1H, m, H-3), 5.72 (1H, t, J = 10.5 Hz, H-11), 5.23 (1H, d, J = 9.9 Hz, H-12), 3.17 (1H, dd, J = 9.3, 5.1 Hz, H-17), 1.35 (3H, s, 18-CH3), 1.02 (3H, s, 19-CH3), 2.16 (3H, s, 21-CH3), 6.91 (1H, qq, J = 7.2, 1.0 Hz, Tig1-H-3), 1.59 (3H, d, J = 7.1 Hz, Tig1-H-4), 1.78 (3H, s, Tig1-H-5), 7.04 (1H, qq, J = 7.1, 1.1 Hz, Tig2-H-3), 1.63 (3H, d, J = 7.1 Hz, Tig2-H-4), 1.88 (3H, s, Tig2-H-5), 4.82 (1H, dd, J = 9.7, 1.4 Hz, Can-H-1), 1.52 (1H, d, J = 6.2 Hz, Can-H-6), 5.08 (1H, d, J = 8.1 Hz, Allo-H-1), 1.57 (3H, d, J = 6.2, Allo-H-6), 3.79 (1H, s, Allo-3-OCH3), 4.93 (1H, d, J = 7.7 Hz, Glc-H-1). 13C-NMR data (150 MHz, pyridine-d 5) see Tables 1 and 2. Marstenacisside C5 (5): C54H72O20; white amorphous powder; [α]20DD = +71.8 (c = 0.0311, CH3OH). HRESIMS (negative): m/z 1039.4574 [M−H]− (calcd. for C54H71O20, 1039.4539). 1H-NMR data (500 MHz, pyridine-d 5): δ 3.85 (1H, m, H-3), 5.44 (1H, d, J = 4.6 Hz, H-6), 6.75 (1H, t, J = 10.7 Hz, H-11), 5.79 (1H, d, J = 10.0 Hz, H-12), 3.31 (1H, overlap, H-17), 1.80 (3H, s, 18-CH3), 1.74 (3H, s, 19-CH3), 2.10 (3H, s, 21-CH3), 8.04 (2H, qq, J = 7.1, 1.4 Hz, Bz1-H-3, 7), 7.20 (2H, overlap, Bz1-H-4, 6), 7.31 (3H, t, J = 7.4 Hz, Bz1-H-5), 8.12 (2H, d, J = 7.9 Hz, Bz2-H-3, 7), 7.20 (2H, dd, J = 7.8, 7.4 Hz, Bz2-H-4, 6), 7.39 (3H, t, J = 7.4 Hz, Bz2-H-5), 4.87 (1H, d, J = 9.6 Hz, Can-H-1), 1.50 (1H, d, J = 6.0 Hz, Can-H-6), 5.08 (1H, d, J = 8.0 Hz, Allo-H-1), 1.58 (3H, d, J = 6.2, Allo-H-6), 3.80 (1H, s, Allo-3-OCH3), 4.95 (1H, d, J = 7.8 Hz, Glc-H-1). 13C-NMR data (125 MHz, pyridine-d 5) see Tables 1 and 2. Marstenacisside C6 (6): C50H76O20; white amorphous powder; [α]25DD = +26.2 (c = 0.0725, CH3OH). HRESIMS (negative): m/z 995.4868 [M−H]− (calcd. for C50H75O20, 995.4852). 1H-NMR data (600 MHz, pyridine-d 5): δ 3.85 (1H, m, H-3), 6.42 (1H, t, J = 10.5 Hz, H-11), 5.46 (1H, d, J = 10.2 Hz, H-12), 3.19 (1H, dd, J = 9.0, 5.4 Hz H-17), 1.65 (3H, s, 18-CH3), 1.58 (3H, s, 19-CH3), 2.18 (3H, s, 21-CH3), 6.96 (1H, dq, J = 6.6, 1.2 Hz, Tig1-H-3), 1.58 (3H, d, J = 8.4 Hz, Tig1-H-4), 1.81 (3H, s, Tig1-H-5), 7.07 (1H, dq, J = 7.2, 1.8 Hz, Tig2-H-3), 1.63 (3H, d, J = 7.2 Hz, Tig2-H-4), 1.89 (3H, s, Tig2-H-5), 4.88 (1H, dd, J = 9.6, 1.8 Hz, Can-H-1), 1.52 (1H, d, J = 6.0 Hz, Can-H-6), 5.08 (1H, d, J = 8.4 Hz, Allo-H-1), 1.57 (3H, d, J = 6.0, Allo-H-6), 3.83 (1H, s, Allo-3-OCH3), 4.93 (1H, d, J = 7.8 Hz, Glc-H-1). 13C-NMR data (150 MHz, pyridine-d 5) see Tables 1 and 2. Marstenacisside C7 (7): C52H74O20; white amorphous powder; [α]25DD = +45.1 (c = 0.0592, CH3OH). HRESIMS (negative): m/z 1017.4708 [M−H]− (calcd. for C52H73O20, 1017.4695). 1H-NMR data (500 MHz, pyridine-d 5): δ 3.87 (1H, m, H-3), 5.43 (1H, brs, H-6), 6.57 (1H, t, J = 10.7 Hz, H-11), 5.66 (1H, d, J = 10.1 Hz, H-12), 3.32 (1H, overlap, H-17), 1.75 (3H, s, 18-CH3), 1.71 (3H, s, 19-CH3), 2.09 (3H, s, 21-CH3), 6.77 (1H, q, J = 7.0 Hz, Tig-H-3), 1.38 (3H, d, J = 7.0 Hz, Tig-H-4), 1.55 (3H, s, Tig-H-5), 8.29 (2H, d, J = 7.8 Hz, Bz-H-3, 7), 7.43 (2H, dd, J = 7.8, 7.3 Hz, Bz-H-4, 6), 7.52 (1H, t, J = 7.3 Hz, Bz-H-5), 4.86 (1H, br d, J = 9.6 Hz, Can-H-1), 1.53 (1H, overlap, Can-H-6), 5.09 (1H, d, J = 7.9 Hz, Allo-H-1), 1.59 (3H, d, J = 6.0, Allo-H-6), 3.81 (1H, s, Allo-3-OCH3), 4.96 (1H, d, J = 7.8 Hz, Glc-H-1). 13C-NMR data (125 MHz, pyridine-d 5) see Tables 1 and 2. Marstenacisside C8 (8): C56H76O20; white amorphous powder; [α]25DD = +43.0 (c = 0.0558, CH3OH). HRESIMS (negative): m/z 1019.4888 [M−H]− (calcd. for C52H75O20, 1019.4852). 1H-NMR data (600 MHz, pyridine-d 5): δ 3.88 (1H, m, H-3), 6.58 (1H, t, J = 10.8 Hz, H-11), 5.79 (1H, d, J = 10.2 Hz, H-12), 3.32 (1H, overlap, H-17), 1.70 (3H, s, 18-CH3), 1.50 (3H, s, 19-CH3), 2.03 (3H, s, 21-CH3), 6.80 (1H, dq, J = 7.1, 1.4 Hz, Tig-H-3), 1.35 (3H, d, J = 7.1 Hz, Tig-H-4), 1.51 (3H, s, Tig-H-5), 8.24 (2H, d, J = 7.8 Hz, Bz-H-3, 7), 7.40 (2H, dd, J = 7.8, 7.4 Hz, Bz-H-4, 6), 7.49 (3H, t, J = 7.4 Hz, Bz2-H-5), 4.88 (1H, d, J = 9.6 Hz, Can-H-1), 1.55 (1H, d, J = 6.2 Hz, Can-H-6), 5.08 (1H, d, J = 8.2 Hz, Allo-H-1), 1.57 (3H, d, J = 6.2, Allo-H-6), 3.80 (1H, s, Allo-3-OCH3), 4.93 (1H, d, J = 7.8 Hz, Glc-H-1). 13C-NMR data (150 MHz, pyridine-d 5) see Tables 1 and 2. Marstenacisside C9 (9): C50H78O20; white amorphous powder; [α]25DD = + 25.9 (c = 0.0625, CH3OH). HRESIMS (negative): m/z 997.5027 [M−H]− (calcd. for C50H77O20, 997.5008). 1H-NMR data (600 MHz, pyridine-d 5): δ 3.89 (1H, m, H-3), 6.45 (1H, t, J = 10.5 Hz, H-11), 5.39 (1H, d, J = 10.2 Hz, H-12), 3.24 (1H, dd, J = 9.2, 5.7 Hz, H-17), 1.61 (3H, s, 18-CH3), 1.48 (3H, s, 19-CH3), 2.13 (3H, s, 21-CH3), 6.94 (1H, qq, J = 7.1, 1.4 Hz, Tig1-H-3), 1.59 (3H, d, J = 7.1 Hz, Tig1-H-4), 1.79 (3H, s, Tig1-H-5), 7.02 (1H, qq, J = 7.1, 1.4 Hz, Tig2-H-3), 1.60 (3H, d, J = 7.1 Hz, Tig2-H-4), 1.86 (3H, s, Tig2-H-5), 4.88 (1H, dd, J = 9.6, 1.8 Hz, Can-H-1), 1.55 (1H, d, J = 6.2 Hz, Can-H-6), 5.08 (1H, d, J = 8.2 Hz, Allo-H-1), 1.57 (3H, d, J = 6.2, Allo-H-6), 3.80 (1H, s, Allo-3-OCH3), 4.93 (1H, d, J = 7.8 Hz, Glc-H-1). 13C-NMR data (150 MHz, pyridine-d 5) see Tables 1 and 2. Marstenacisside C10 (10); C52H74O19; white amorphous powder; [α]25DD = + 18.4 (c = 0.0550, CH3OH). HRESIMS (negative): m/z 1001.4797 [M−H]− (calcd. for C52H73O19, 1001.4746). 1H-NMR data (500 MHz, pyridine-d 5): δ 3.85 (1H, m, H-3), 5.86 (1H, t, J = 10.1 Hz, H-11), 5.53 (1H, d, J = 10.1 Hz, H-12), 3.08 (1H, dd, J = 11.6, 6.4 Hz, H-17), 1.56 (3H, s, 18-CH3), 1.27 (3H, s, 19-CH3), 2.02 (3H, s, 21-CH3), 6.76 (1H, q, J = 7.1 Hz, Tig-H-3), 1.35 (3H, d, J = 7.0 Hz, Tig-H-4), 1.50 (3H, s, Tig-H-5), 8.16 (2H, d, J = 7.9 Hz, Bz-H-3, 7), 7.37 (2H, dd, J = 7.9, 7.4 Hz, Bz-H-4, 6), 7.46 (3H, t, J = 7.4 Hz, Bz2-H-5), 4.87 (1H, br d, J = 9.7 Hz, Can-H-1), 1.60 (1H, d, J = 6.2 Hz, Can-H-6), 5.11 (1H, d, J = 8.0 Hz, Allo-H-1), 1.55 (3H, overlap, Allo-H-6), 3.81 (1H, s, Allo-3-OCH3), 4.96 (1H, d, J = 7.9 Hz, Glc-H-1). 13C-NMR data (125 MHz, pyridine-d 5) see Tables 1 and 2. Marstenacisside D1 (11): C41H62O14; white amorphous powder; [α]20DD = +26.2 (c = 0.0311, CH3OH). HRESIMS (negative): m/z 823.4079 [M+HCOO] − (calcd. for C42H63O16, 823.4116). 1H-NMR data (600 MHz, pyridine-d 5): δ 3.78 (1H, m, H-3), 5.49 (1H, br d, J = 6.0 Hz, H-6), 5.74 (1H, t, J = 10.2 Hz, H-11), 5.25 (1H, d, J = 10.2 Hz, H-12), 3.15 (1H, dd, J = 9.0, 4.8 Hz, H-17), 1.35 (3H, s, 18-CH3), 1.23 (3H, s, 19-CH3), 2.17 (3H, s, 21-CH3), 1.93 (3H, s, Ac-H-2), 7.16 (1H, q, J = 7.2 Hz, Tig-H-3), 1.68 (3H, d, J = 6.6 Hz, Tig-H-4), 1.97 (3H, s, Tig-H-5), 4.86 (1H, d, J = 10.4 Hz, Can-H-1), 1.93 (1H, m, Can-H-2a), 2.43 (1H, m, Can-H-2b), 3.95 (1H, m, Can-H-3), 3.37 (1H, t, J = 9.0 Hz, Can-H-4), 3.62 (H, m, Can-H-5), 1.48 (3H, d, J = 6.1 Hz, Can-H-6), 5.12 (1H, d, J = 7.2 Hz, Allo-H-1), 3.94 (1H, m, Allo-H-2), 4.06 (1H, t-like, Allo-H-3), 3.61 (1H, m, Allo-H-4), 4.20 (1H, m, Allo-H-5), 1.46 (3H, d, J = 6.0, Allo-H-6), 3.81 (1H, s, Allo-3-OCH3). 13C-NMR data (150 MHz, pyridine-d 5) see Tables 1 and 2. Marstenacisside D2 (12): C44H66O14; white amorphous powder; [α]20DD = + 58.8 (c = 0.0289, CH3OH). HRESIMS (negative): m/z 863.4423 [M+HCOO] − (calcd. for C45H67O16, 863.4429). 1H-NMR data (600 MHz, pyridine-d 5): δ 3.78 (1H, m, H-3), 5.51 (1H, br d, J = 6.0 Hz, H-6), 5.88 (1H, t, J = 10.4 Hz, H-11), 5.30 (1H, d, J = 9.6 Hz, H-12), 3.17 (1H, dd, J = 9.6, 4.8 Hz, H-17), 1.39 (3H, s, 18-CH3), 1.30 (3H, s, 19-CH3), 2.17 (3H, s, 21-CH3), 6.92 (1H, qq, J = 6.0, 1.2 Hz, Tig1-H-3), 1.57 (3H, d, J = 7.2 Hz, Tig1-H-4), 1.78 (3H, s, Tig1-H-5), 7.06 (1H, qq, J = 6.6, 1.2 Hz, Tig2-H-3), 1.64 (3H, d, J = 7.2 Hz, Tig2-H-4), 1.89 (3H, s, Tig2-H-5), 4.82 (1H, dd, J = 9.6, 1.8 Hz, Can-H-1), 1.48 (1H, d, J = 6.0 Hz, Can-H-6), 5.10 (1H, d, J = 7.8 Hz, Allo-H-1), 1.57 (3H, d, J = 6.0, Allo-H-6), 3.81 (1H, s, Allo-3-OCH3). 13C-NMR data (150 MHz, pyridine-d 5) see Tables 1 and 2. Marstenacisside D3 (13): C44H66O15; white amorphous powder; [α]20DD = +49.8 (c = 0.0389, CH3OH). HRESIMS (negative): m/z 879.4347 [M+HCOO] − (calcd. for C45H67O17, 879.4378). 1H-NMR data (600 MHz, pyridine-d 5): δ 3.85 (1H, m, H-3), 6.51 (1H, t, J = 8.4 Hz, H-11), 5.45 (1H, d, J = 10.4 Hz, H-12), 3.19 (1H, dd, J = 8.4, 4.8 Hz H-17), 1.65 (3H, s, 18-CH3), 1.57 (3H, s, 19-CH3), 2.17 (3H, s, 21-CH3), 6.97 (1H, dq, J = 7.2, 1.2 Hz, Tig1-H-3), 1.58 (3H, d, J = 8.4 Hz, Tig1-H-4), 1.80 (3H, s, Tig1-H-5), 7.07 (1H, dq, J = 7.2, 1.2 Hz, Tig2-H-3), 1.62 (3H, d, J = 7.2 Hz, Tig2-H-4), 1.90 (3H, s, Tig2-H-5), 4.86 (1H, dd, J = 9.6, 1.8 Hz, Can-H-1), 1.46 (1H, d, J = 6.0 Hz, Can-H-6), 5.10 (1H, d, J = 7.4 Hz, Allo-H-1), 1.57 (3H, d, J = 6.6, Allo-H-6), 3.81 (1H, s, Allo-3-OCH3). 13C-NMR data (150 MHz, pyridine-d 5) see Tables 1 and 2. Marstenacisside D4 (14): C43H60O15; white amorphous powder; [α]20DD = +59.4 (c = 0.0211, CH3OH). HRESIMS (negative): m/z 861.3910 [M+HCOO] − (calcd. for C44H61O17, 861.3909). 1H-NMR data (600 MHz, pyridine-d 5): δ 3.87 (1H, m, H-3), 5.39 (1H, br d, J = 6.0 Hz, H-6), 6.39 (1H, t, J = 10.4 Hz, H-11), 5.60 (1H, d, J = 9.6 Hz, H-12), 3.26 (1H, dd, J = 9.0, 4.8 Hz, H-17), 1.74 (3H, s, 18-CH3), 1.71 (3H, s, 19-CH3), 2.07 (3H, s, 21-CH3), 1.60 (3H, s, Ac-H-2), 8.37 (2H, d, J = 6.6 Hz, Bz-H-3, 7), 7.48 (2H, t, J = 7.8 Hz, Bz-H-4, 6), 7.54 (3H, overlap, Bz2-H-5), 4.88 (1H, dd, J = 9.6, 3.0 Hz, Can-H-1), 1.47 (1H, d, J = 7.2 Hz, Can-H-6), 5.10 (1H, d, J = 7.4 Hz, Allo-H-1), 1.60 (3H, d, J = 7.2, Allo-H-6), 3.81 (1H, s, Allo-3-OCH3). 13C-NMR data (150 MHz, pyridine-d 5) see Tables 1 and 2. Marstenacisside D5 (15): C46H64O15; white amorphous powder; [α]20DD = + 67.0 (c = 0.0556, CH3OH). HRESIMS (negative): m/z 901.4215 [M−H]− (calcd. for C47H65O17, 901.4222). 1H-NMR data (600 MHz, pyridine-d 5): δ 3.87 (1H, m, H-3), 6.55 (1H, t, J = 10.4 Hz, H-11), 5.64 (1H, d, J = 9.6 Hz, H-12), 3.27 (1H, 1H, dd, J = 8.4, 4.8 Hz, H-17), 1.73 (3H, s, 18-CH3), 1.69 (3H, s, 19-CH3), 2.08 (3H, s, 21-CH3), 6.81 (1H, dq, J = 7.2, 1.2 Hz, Tig-H-3), 1.37 (3H, d, J = 6.0 Hz, Tig-H-4), 1.54 (3H, s, Tig-H-5), 8.28 (2H, d, J = 7.2 Hz, Bz-H-3, 7), 7.42 (2H, t, J = 8.4 Hz, Bz-H-4, 6), 7.51 (3H, t, J = 7.2 Hz, Bz-H-5), 4.87 (1H, dd, J = 9.6, 1.8 Hz, Can-H-1), 1.46 (1H, d, J = 6.0 Hz, Can-H-6), 5.11 (1H, d, J = 8.4 Hz, Allo-H-1), 1.57 (3H, d, J = 6.0, Allo-H-6), 3.81 (1H, s, Allo-3-OCH3). 13C-NMR data (150 MHz, pyridine-d 5) see Tables 1 and 2. Marstenacisside D6 (16): C46H64O15; white amorphous powder; [α]20DD = +58.8 (c = 0.0278, CH3OH). HRESIMS (negative): m/z 901.4191 [M+HCOO] − (calcd. for C47H65O17, 901.4222). 1H-NMR data (600 MHz, pyridine-d 5): δ 3.84 (1H, m, H-3), 6.61 (1H, t, J = 10.2 Hz, H-11), 5.58 (1H, d, J = 10.4 Hz, H-12), 3.22 (1H, dd, J = 7.2, 3.0 Hz, H-17), 1.71 (3H, s, 18-CH3), 1.69 (3H, s, 19-CH3), 2.18 (3H, s, 21-CH3), 6.90 (1H, dq, J = 7.2, 1.2 Hz, Tig-H-3), 1.42 (3H, d, J = 8.4 Hz, Tig-H-4), 1.61 (3H, s, Tig-H-5), 8.18 (2H, d, J = 6.6 Hz, Bz-H-3, 7), 7.38 (2H, t, J = 7.8 Hz, Bz-H-4, 6), 7.45 (3H, t, J = 6.0 Hz, Bz-H-5), 4.83 (1H, dd, J = 9.6, 1.8 Hz, Can-H-1), 1.45 (1H, d, J = 6.0 Hz, Can-H-6), 5.09 (1H, d, J = 7.8 Hz, Allo-H-1), 1.53 (3H, d, J = 6.0, Allo-H-6), 3.81 (1H, s, Allo-3-OCH3). 13C-NMR data (150 MHz, pyridine-d 5) see Tables 1 and 2. Marstenacisside D7 (17): C46H66O15; white amorphous powder; [α]20DD = +97.5 (c = 0.0139, CH3OH). HRESIMS (negative): m/z 903.4367 [M+HCOO] − (calcd. for C47H67O17, 903.4378). 1H-NMR data (600 MHz, pyridine-d 5): δ 3.86 (1H, m, H-3), 6.64 (1H, t, J = 10.4 Hz, H-11), 5.52 (1H, d, J = 10.2 Hz, H-12), 3.27 (1H, dd, J = 8.4, 4.8 Hz, H-17), 1.66 (3H, s, 18-CH3), 1.52 (3H, s, 19-CH3), 2.14 (3H, s, 21-CH3), 6.86 (1H, dq, J = 7.2, 1.2 Hz, Tig-H-3), 1.38 (3H, d, J = 7.2 Hz, Tig-H-4), 1.52 (3H, s, Tig-H-5), 8.17 (2H, d, J = 7.2 Hz, Bz-H-3, 7), 7.39 (2H, t, J = 7.8 Hz, Bz-H-4, 6), 7.45 (3H, t, J = 7.2 Hz, Bz2-H-5), 4.87 (1H, dd, J = 9.6, 1.8 Hz, Can-H-1), 1.46 (1H, d, J = 6.0 Hz, Can-H-6), 5.10 (1H, d, J = 7.8 Hz, Allo-H-1), 1.52 (3H, d, J = 6.0, Allo-H-6), 3.80 (1H, s, Allo-3-OCH3). 13C-NMR data (150 MHz, pyridine-d 5) see Tables 1 and 2. Marstenacisside E1 (18): C45H68O14; [α]20DD = + 32.9 (c = 0.035, CH3OH). HRESIMS (negative): m/z 831.4525 [M−H]− (calcd. for C45H67O14, 831.4531). 1H-NMR data (600 MHz, pyridine-d 5): δ 3.81 (1H, m, H-3), 5.30 (1H, m, H-6), 5.90 (1H, m, H-11), 5.52 (1H, d-like, H-12), 3.19 (1H, m, H-17), 1.39 (3H, s, 18-CH3), 1.31 (3H, s, 19-CH3), 2.16 (3H, s, 21-CH3), 6.92 (1H, m, Tig1-H-3), 1.64 (3H, overlap, Tig1-H-4), 1.78 (3H, s, Tig1-H-5), 7.07 (1H, m, Tig2-H-3), 1.64 (3H, overlap, Tig2-H-4), 1.89 (3H, s, Tig2-H-5), 4.75 (1H, dd, J = 7.7, 2.0 Hz, Ole-H-1), 1.53 (1H, overlap, Ole-H-6), 3.50 (1H, s, Ole-3-OCH3), 5.29 (1H, d, J = 8.0 Hz, Allo-H-1), 1.61 (3H, d, J = 6.0, Allo-H-6), 3.81 (1H, s, Allo-3-OCH3). 13C-NMR data (150 MHz, pyridine-d 5) see Tables 1 and 2. Marstenacisside E2 (19): C45H68O15; [α]20DD = + 59.2 (c = 0.0245, CH3OH). HRESIMS (negative): m/z 847.4548 [M−H]− (calcd. for C45H67O15, 847.4480). 1H-NMR data (600 MHz, pyridine-d 5): δ 3.86 (1H, m, H-3), 5.42 (1H, d, J = 5.9 Hz, H-6), 6.43 (1H, t, J = 8.4 Hz, H-11), 5.46 (1H, d, J = 10.2 Hz, H-12), 3.19 (1H, dd, J = 8.7, 4.6 Hz, H-17), 1.68 (3H, s, 18-CH3), 1.65 (3H, s, 19-CH3), 2.17 (3H, s, 21-CH3), 6.96 (1H, dq, J = 7.1, 1.3 Hz, Tig1-H-3), 1.58 (3H, d, J = 7.3 Hz, Tig1-H-4), 1.81 (3H, s, Tig1-H-5), 7.06 (1H, m, Tig2-H-3), 1.62 (3H, overlap, Tig2-H-4), 1.88 (3H, s, Tig2-H-5), 4.77 (1H, dd, J = 9.7, 2.0 Hz, Ole-H-1), 1.53 (1H, J = 6.2 Hz, Ole-H-6), 3.49 (1H, s, Ole-3-OCH3), 5.29 (1H, d, J = 8.1 Hz, Allo-H-1), 1.61 (3H, overlap, H-6), 3.81 (1H, s, Allo-3-OCH3). 13C-NMR data (150 MHz, pyridine-d 5) see Tables 1 and 2. Marstenacisside E3 (20): C47H66O15; [α]20DD = + 63.3 (c = 0.019, CH3OH). HRESIMS (negative): m/z 869.4307 [M−H]− (calcd. for C47H65O15, 869.4323). 1H-NMR data (600 MHz, pyridine-d 5): δ 3.87 (1H, m, H-3), 5.42 (1H, d, J = 5.9 Hz, H-6), 6.56 (1H, t, J = 10.4 Hz, H-11), 5.65 (1H, d, J = 9.6 Hz, H-12), 3.28 (1H, 1H, dd, J = 9.9, 4.9 Hz, H-17), 1.73 (3H, s, 18-CH3), 1.69 (3H, s, 19-CH3), 2.07 (3H, s, 21-CH3), 6.82 (1H, dq, J = 7.2, 1.2 Hz, Tig-H-3), 1.37 (3H, d, J = 6.0 Hz, Tig-H-4), 1.53 (3H, s, Tig-H-5), 8.28 (2H, d, J = 7.2 Hz, Bz-H-3, 7), 7.41 (2H, t, J = 8.4 Hz, Bz-H-4, 6), 7.50 (3H, t, J = 7.1 Hz, Bz-H-5), 4.77 (1H, dd, J = 9.7, 2.0 Hz, Ole-H-1), 1.53 (1H, J = 6.2 Hz, Ole-H-6), 3.49 (1H, s, Ole-3-OCH3), 5.29 (1H, d, J = 8.0 Hz, Allo-H-1), 1.62 (3H, overlap, H-6), 3.81 (1H, s, Allo-3-OCH3). 13C-NMR data (150 MHz, pyridine-d 5) see Tables 1 and 2. Marstenacisside E4 (21): C47H66O15; [α]20DD = +48.6 (c = 0.0494, CH3OH). HRESIMS (negative): m/z 869.4407 [M−H]− (calcd. for C47H65O15, 869.4323). 1H-NMR data (600 MHz, pyridine-d 5): δ 3.86 (1H, m, H-3), 6.61 (1H, t, J = 10.6 Hz, H-11), 5.59 (1H, d, J = 10.4 Hz, H-12), 3.22 (1H, dd, J = 9.2, 4.6 Hz, H-17), 1.71 (3H, s, 18-CH3), 1.69 (3H, s, 19-CH3), 2.18 (3H, s, 21-CH3), 6.99 (1H, dq, J = 7.1, 1.2 Hz, Tig-H-3), 1.42 (3H, d, J = 7.1 Hz, Tig-H-4), 1.61 (3H, s, Tig-H-5), 8.19 (2H, d, J = 7.1 Hz, Bz-H-3, 7), 7.37 (2H, t, J = 7.6 Hz, Bz-H-4, 6), 7.44 (3H, t, J = 7.5 Hz, Bz-H-5), 4.74 (1H, dd, J = 9.7, 2.0 Hz, Ole-H-1), 1.52 (1H, J = 6.2 Hz, Ole-H-6), 3.49 (1H, s, Ole-3-OCH3), 5.28 (1H, overlap, Allo-H-1), 1.60 (3H, overlap, H-6), 3.81 (1H, s, Allo-3-OCH3). 13C-NMR data (150 MHz, pyridine-d 5) see Tables 1 and 2. Marstenacisside E5 (22): C45H70O15; [α]20DD = +44.3 (c = 0.0305, CH3OH). HRESIMS (negative): m/z 849.4713 [M−H]− (calcd. for C45H69O15, 849.4636). 1H-NMR data (600 MHz, pyridine-d 5): δ 3.88 (1H, m, H-3), 6.45 (1H, t, J = 11.0 Hz, H-11), 5.40 (1H, d, J = 10.1 Hz, H-12), 3.25 (1H, dd, J = 9.3, 5.4 Hz, H-17), 1.62 (3H, s, 18-CH3), 1.50 (3H, s, 19-CH3), 2.13 (3H, s, 21-CH3), 6.94 (1H, qq, J = 6.8, 1.4 Hz, Tig1-H-3), 1.59 (3H, overlap, Tig1-H-4), 1.79 (3H, s, Tig1-H-5), 7.03 (1H, qq, J = 6.9, 1.4 Hz, Tig2-H-3), 1.60 (3H, overlap, Tig2-H-4), 1.86 (3H, s, Tig2-H-5), 4.81 (1H, dd, J = 9.7, 2.0 Hz, Ole-H-1), 1.53 (1H, J = 6.0 Hz, Ole-H-6), 3.50 (1H, s, Ole-3-OCH3), 5.30 (1H, overlap, Allo-H-1), 1.61 (3H, overlap, H-6), 3.82 (1H, s, Allo-3-OCH3). 13C-NMR data (150 MHz, pyridine-d 5) see Tables 1 and 2. Marstenacisside E6 (23): C47H66O14; [α]20DD = +53.5 (c = 0.0194, CH3OH). HRESIMS (negative): m/z 853.4401 [M−H]− (calcd. for C47H65O14, 851.4374). 1H-NMR data (600 MHz, pyridine-d 5): δ 3.88 (1H, m, H-3), 5.85 (1H, t, J = 10.1 Hz, H-11), 5.52 (1H, d, J = 10.1 Hz, H-12), 3.07 (1H, dd, J = 11.5, 6.1 Hz, H-17), 1.53 (3H, s, 18-CH3), 1.27 (3H, s, 19-CH3), 2.00 (3H, s, 21-CH3), 6.75 (1H, q, J = 7.1 Hz, Tig-H-3), 1.34 (3H, d, J = 7.1 Hz, Tig-H-4), 1.49 (3H, s, Tig-H-5), 8.15 (2H, dd, J = 6.8, 1.2 Hz, Bz-H-3, 7), 7.35 (2H, t, J = 8.1 Hz, Bz-H-4, 6), 7.44 (3H, t, J = 7.4 Hz, Bz2-H-5), 4.79 (1H, dd, J = 9.7, 1.6 Hz, Ole-H-1), 1.53 (1H, overlap, Ole-H-6), 3.51 (1H, s, Ole-3-OCH3), 5.31 (1H, d, J = 8.0 Hz, Allo-H-1), 1.65 (3H, overlap, H-6), 3.82 (1H, s, Allo-3-OCH3). 13C-NMR data (150 MHz, pyridine-d 5) see Tables 1 and 2. 11α,12β-O-Ditigloyl-tenacigenin C (24): C31H46O8; [α]20DD = + 51.3 (c = 0.0025, CH3OH). HRESIMS (negative): m/z 545.3143 [M−H]− (calcd. for C31H45O8, 545.31114). 1H-NMR data (600 MHz, pyridine-d 5): δ 3.92 (1H, m, H-3), 6.50 (1H, t, J = 10.6 Hz, H-11), 5.43 (1H, d, J = 10.1 Hz, H-12), 3.26 (1H, dd, J = 9.5, 5.3 Hz, H-17), 1.63 (3H, s, 18-CH3), 1.55 (3H, s, 19-CH3), 2.14 (3H, s, 21-CH3), 7.00 (1H, qq, J = 7.1, 1.4 Hz, Tig1-H-3), 1.61 (3H, overlap, Tig1-H-4), 1.84 (3H, s, Tig1-H-5), 7.05 (1H, m, Tig2-H-3), 1.61 (6H, overlap,Tig2-H-4), 1.89 (3H, s, Tig2-H-5). 13C-NMR data (150 MHz, pyridine-d 5) see Table 1. 11α-O-Benzoyl-12β-O-tigloyl-tenacigenin C (25): C33H44O8; [α]20DD = +43.8 (c = 0.0172, CH3OH). HRESIMS (negative): m/z 567.2981 [M−H]− (calcd. for C33H43O8, 567.2958). 1H-NMR data (600 MHz, pyridine-d 5): δ 3.89 (1H, m, H-3), 6.69 (1H, t, J = 10.3 Hz, H-11), 5.56 (1H, d, J = 10.1 Hz, H-12), 3.29 (1H, dd, J = 9.4, 5.2 Hz, H-17), 1.68 (3H, s, 18-CH3), 1.58 (3H, s, 19-CH3), 2.14 (3H, s, 21-CH3), 6.88 (1H, dq, J = 7.1, 1.2 Hz, Tig-H-3), 1.38 (3H, d, J = 7.2 Hz, Tig-H-4), 1.52 (3H, s, Tig-H-5), 8.22 (2H, d, J = 7.0 Hz, Bz-H-3, 7), 7.40 (2H, t, J = 7.1 Hz, Bz-H-4, 6), 7.46 (3H, t-like, Bz2-H-5). 13C-NMR data (150 MHz, pyridine-d 5) see Table 1. 11α-O-Tigloyl-12β-O-benzoyl-tenacigenin C (26): C33H44O8; [α]20DD = + 101.5 (c = 0.022, CH3OH). HRESIMS (negative): m/z 567.2987 [M−H]− (calcd. for C33H43O8, 567.2958). 1H-NMR data (600 MHz, pyridine-d 5): δ 3.92 (1H, m, H-3), 6.63 (1H, t, J = 11.3 Hz, H-11), 5.62 (1H, d, J = 10.1 Hz, H-12), 3.35 (1H, dd, J = 9.1, 4.9 Hz, H-17), 1.72 (3H, s, 18-CH3), 1.57 (3H, s, 19-CH3), 2.04 (3H, s, 21-CH3), 6.86 (1H, dq, J = 7.2, 1.2 Hz, Tig-H-3), 1.38 (3H, d, J = 7.1 Hz, Tig-H-4), 1.57 (3H, s, Tig-H-5), 8.26 (2H, d, J = 6.9 Hz, Bz-H-3, 7), 7.41 (2H, t, J = 7.9 Hz, Bz-H-4, 6), 7.50 (3H, t, J = 7.5 Hz, Bz2-H-5). 13C-NMR data (150 MHz, pyridine-d 5) see Table 1. 11α-O-Tigloyl-12β-O-benzoyl-marsdenin (27): C33H42O8; [α]20DD = + 34.7 (c = 0.0235, CH3OH). HRESIMS (negative): m/z 565.6849 [M−H]− (calcd. for C33H41O8, 565.6837). 1H-NMR data (600 MHz, pyridine-d 5): δ 3.92 (1H, m, H-3), 6.59 (1H, t, J = 10.6 Hz, H-11), 5.66 (1H, d, J = 10.2 Hz, H-12), 3.29 (1H, dd, J = 9.6, 4.8 Hz, H-17), 1.75 (3H, s, 18-CH3), 1.74 (3H, s, 19-CH3), 2.08 (3H, s, 21-CH3), 6.77 (1H, dq, J = 7.1, 1.3 Hz, Tig-H-3), 1.39 (3H, d, J = 7.1 Hz, Tig-H-4), 1.58 (3H, s, Tig-H-5), 8.29 (2H, d, J = 7.0 Hz, Bz-H-3, 7), 7.42 (2H, t, J = 7.5 Hz, Bz-H-4, 6), 7.50 (1H, t, J = 7.6 Hz, Bz-H-5). 13C-NMR data (150 MHz, pyridine-d 5) see Table 1. HIV inhibition assay HIV inhibition assays were carried out according to a reported method [22]. SupT1 cells (2 × 105) were co-transfected with 0.6 mg of pNL-Luc-E and 0.4 mg of pHIT/G. The VSV-G pseudo-typed viral supernatant (HIV-1) was then harvested by filtration through a 0.45-μm filter after 48 h and the concentration of viral capsid protein was determined by p24 antigen capture ELISA (Biomerieux). 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Antiviral Res 91:321–329CrossRefPubMedGoogle Scholar Copyright information © The Japanese Society of Pharmacognosy and Springer Japan KK 2017 About this article CrossMark Cite this article as: Pang, X., Kang, LP., Fang, XM. et al. J Nat Med (2018) 72: 166. https://doi.org/10.1007/s11418-017-1126-1 Received 20 February 2017 Accepted 27 August 2017 First Online 15 September 2017 DOI https://doi.org/10.1007/s11418-017-1126-1 Publisher Name Springer Japan Print ISSN 1340-3443 Online ISSN 1861-0293

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